Energy Efficiency Current NFRC Ratings

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Energy Efficient Windows

American Openings windows have been certified by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) who provides an independent assessment of the “whole product” energy efficiency rating of the windows that we build. The most recent NFRC ratings for each of our window products appears in the table below.

Additionally, all American Openings vinyl windows have been EnergyStar approved as are over 94% of all ThermaTru® door products. We are proud to be an Energy Star partner and are committed to provide our customers with products that demonstrate the high levels of energy efficiency that the Energy Star designation requires.

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Windows by American Openings

Doors by American Openings

Product Type U-Factor Solar Heat Gain
Coefficient
Visible
Transmittance
Series 200 Aluminum Fixed Picture Window Low-E Dual-Glazed 0.39 0.25 0.45
Series 210 Aluminum Single Hung Window Low-E Dual-glazed 0.51 0.23 0.45
Series 220/230 Aluminum Horizontal Slide Low-E Dual Glazed 0.51 0.23 0.45
Series 2010/2020 Aluminum Patio Door Low-E Dual-Glazed 0.52 0.24 0.46
Series V-300 Vinyl Fixed Picture Window Low-E dual Glazed 0.27 0.24 0.46
Series V-310 Vinyl Single Hung Low-E Dual Glazed 0.29 0.20 0.46
Series V-320/330 Vinyl Horizonal Slide Low-E Dual-Glazed 0.29 0.20 0.43
Series V-2002 Vinyl Patio Door Low-E Dual-Glazed 0.27 0.23 0.45
U-Factor is "...a meaure of heat transmission through a building part with lower numbers indicating better insulating properties." Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/u-value
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) is: "...that fraction of incident solar radiation that actually enters a building through the entire window assembly as heat gain." Reference: http://www.commercialwindows.org/shgc.php
Visible Transmittance (VT) is: "...the amount of light in the visible portion of the spectrum that passes through a glazing material. A higher VT means there is more daylight in a space which, if designed properly, can offset electric lighting and its associated cooling loads." Reference: http://www.commercialwindows.org/vt.php